Going In Circles

Perhaps it was the invention of the wheel, that truly opened our eyes to the everyday presence of objects without straight edges.  From the moon to the sun, and the multitude of planets in between, circles exist all around us, unexpectedly appearing in nature, and as functional yet exquisite man-made components in architecture, or inspiring us as soothing elements in artwork.  The word ‘circle’ originates from the Greek word, ‘kirkos’ meaning to bend or make a turn.   

This Spring, circular motifs are one of the biggest trends in knitwear, taking the fashion highway from straight to curvaceous-

Circles in Nature

Droplets of rain hitting the water, illustrate the endless cycle of nature.

Sirdar #9544

Catch the breeze and feel refreshed in this swirly summer vest, an intriguing design worked in four pieces to create the illusion of an endless loop.  Knit in Calico DK from Sirdar, a cool and comfy blend of cotton and acrylic with three new shades, charcoal, taupe, and bottle green.

Concentric Circles

These are concentric circles, radiating outwards from a central bulls-eye, yet maintaining a consistent theme.

Sirdar #9564

Spiraling outwards from a central back panel, this circular design is a showpiece with bobbles, lace and a fluttery edging.  Optional long sleeves make it into a cardigan that will transition easily into all seasons.  Try it in a solid shade or go for a trio of neutrals in Sirdar’s newest Spring release, Raffaella DK,  a cotton mix with a pearly sheen and a crimped texture, available now in ten fresh picks.

Crop Circles

These striking patterns are a mystery, created most often during the night by the flattening of crops such as wheat, barley, and rye.  Ninety percent of all crop circles occur in Britain and explanations are varied.  Could it be a natural weather phenomenon, paranormal activity, or simply a man-made hoax?  Whatever the reason, they are fascinating to look at, and great inspiration for design.

Sirdar #9508

The circular theme resonates once again in this dressy cropped cardigan enhanced with bobbles and leaves.  Knit in Simply Recycled DK, an earth friendly mix of cotton and acrylic from Sirdar with three new shades in stores now, slate, denim, and marigold (shown above). 

Children’s artwork inspired by Wassily Kandinsky, a Russian painter well-known for his abstract work, created a series of circles within squares in the 1920’s. 

Katia Degrade Sun

A bold crocheted motif is effectively applied against a background of knitting and highlights the boho beach vibe, a fun cover-up from the Katia Sport Collection #69.  Knit in Degrade Sun, pure Egyptian cotton dyed in a lively painter’s palette.

  • Anonymous

    Terrific circle inspired designs! Always fun to work in circles.